Category Archives: The Culpeper

LifeSpire seniors to ‘bike for benevolence’ Sept. 28

Bob Hill, 80, a resident of The Culpeper, regularly runs and bikes to keep in shape. Hill will participate in “Biking for Benevolence” Sept. 28, a wellness event hosted by LifeSpire’s Virginia Baptist Homes Foundation.

By Ann Lovell

RICHMOND, Virginia—Never underestimate the strength of a senior. Five LifeSpire of Virginia residents — ranging in age from 70 to 80 — will bike the Virginia Capital trail Sept. 28. The event for LifeSpire residents, staff, trustees and families will highlight Active Aging Week and raise awareness of the mission of Virginia Baptist Homes Foundation, said Patricia Morris, a LifeSpire vice president and head of the VBH Foundation.  The ride offers starting points at mile posts 42, 27 or 20, and the group of 17 riders will finish in Jamestown at mile post 0.

The International Council on Aging designated the last full week in September as Active Aging Week beginning in 2003.  Held this year from Sept. 24-30, Active Aging Week celebrates aging and showcases the capability of older adults. Through the bike event, LifeSpire of Virginia is linking senior wellness with the opportunity to support those who outlive their financial resources, Morris said.

“Last year, VBH Foundation gave more than $1.1 million to 59 life care residents across all four LifeSpire communities. Thanks to the support of our donors, no life care resident has ever been asked to leave a community because they ran out of money,” Morris said. “The support of our foundation provides LifeSpire’s residents the peace of mind that allows them to flourish.”

Riders may start from mile post 42 or 27 at 11 a.m. or at mile post 20 at 12:30 p.m. Riders are expected to finish around 3 p.m. at mile post 0 in Jamestown. The Cap Trail shuttle is providing free shuttle service to event participants.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities across Virginia: The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville, The Chesapeake in Newport News, and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. Contact her at alovell@lifespireliving.org or (804) 521-9192.

Helpful Tips for Downsizing in Retirement

One of the main reasons older adults put off downsizing or moving to a retirement community is the need to deal with all the “stuff” they’ve accumulated over the years. Yet, if done right, the process of downsizing may not be as daunting as you think. It may even be enjoyable — even refreshing. A lot of the physical work can be done by others, so your main role is to categorizeorganize, and direct. Here are six tips to get you started:

Start now

If you are thinking about moving, whether to a retirement community or to a smaller home, now is a good time to start the downsizing process. Don’t wait until you are ready to move. At that point, the process and emotions may be overwhelming, and you will have other things that require your attention. Even if you ultimately choose not to move, your family members will thank you! There will be less stuff for them to deal with one day.

Recognize you can’t keep it all

To know what items you can and should purge, you first need to know which items you absolutely cannot part with. But here’s the key: After you have created the initial list, pare it down even further. This can be a tough exercise, but the reality is that some of the things you think you need to save may not be necessary to keep after all. For example, that sport coat in the closet you’ve held onto for 15 years because you are sure you will wear it again? It’s probably time to part ways. That stack of magazines with holiday recipes dating back 10 years? Those can go, too. Your most cherished recipes will not be hidden in a tall stack of magazines anyway, right?

Prepare yourself: Your kids may not want your stuff

Another popular reason for hanging on to various items is that kids or grandkids will want them. But many people eventually discover that the things they thought would be coveted by their adult children were not so desirable after all. To help sort this out, consider inviting your children over for a day to go through your things and find out what they actually want.

Sort by large and small

Once you know what you want to keep, make a list of big and small items. The big items are anything that will not fit in a regular size moving box, such as a sofa or table. As you consider these items, be sure to think about the dimensions and style of your new home so you will know if they will fit. Many CCRCs have move-in coordinators who can help you with this.

Obviously, it could be tough to list out every single smaller item, but you want to think about your most utilized items first. Consider things like silverware, pictures, kitchenware, books, etc.

Sell, donate, or discard?

Once you’ve decided what items are no longer needed, it is time to decide what to do with them. Create a separate list with three columns: Sell, Donate, and Trash. As you consider what you want to sell, remember that items rarely bring in the amount of cash the owner thinks they will. In some cases it may simply be easier to donate or discard an item than to go to the trouble of trying to sell it.

However, if you feel sure it would be worth the time to try to sell some of your belongings, then you have a number of options. You could try to sell them online with sites like Ebay or Craig’s List. (Please take caution if you use Craigslist or a similar website. If possible, meet the buyer in a public place and take someone with you.) Sometimes a good old-fashioned yard sale could do the job, but you will want to get someone to help you with the set up and break down. Alternately, if you have more than a few valuable items, any number of local companies will be willing to administer an estate sale for you.

Hauling the junk

Finally, after you have gone through the above-mentioned steps, you may be surprised by the amount of left over junk. This would include things that have piled up in a garage or crawlspace over the years, such as old paint cans. Many national companies will come by and haul these things away for you. All you have to do is point to the items you want removed, and they will recycle or trash the items accordingly.

If you are considering moving to a LifeSpire community, our move-in coordinators are happy to help you think through what you might or might not need in your new home. Give our marketing departments a call and set up an appointment today!

The Chesapeake (Newport News): 757-223-1600
The Culpeper (Culpeper): 540-825-2411
The Glebe (Daleville): 540-591-2100
Lakewood (Richmond): 804-740-2900

 

 

Content provided by MyLifeSite.com

The Culpeper breaks ground

05/23/17

By Ann Lovell

Residents and guests recite “The Pledge of Allegiance” at The Culpeper’s groundbreaking May 10.

More than 225 residents, staff and guests of The Culpeper, a LifeSpire of Virginia continuing care retirement community, gathered May 10 to break ground on their new home — an estimated $23 million, 125,000 square-foot facility that will include space for independent living, assisted living, and skilled nursing and memory care. The new Culpeper will also offer residents larger living space, modern dining facilities, and a state-of-the-art fitness center.

Randall Robinson (right), former president and CEO, and Mick Feauto, Executive Vice President and COO of LifeSpire, talk with LifeSpire of Virginia staff .

Utilizing the theme, “Building for Tomorrow,” the afternoon was a celebration of The Culpeper’s past, present and future. Randall Robinson, former president and CEO of Virginia Baptist Homes, the predecessor to LifeSpire of Virginia, recalled The Culpeper’s history and the courage and vision it took for Dr. J.T. Edwards, then pastor of Culpeper Baptist Church, to build the very first Virginia Baptist Home just following World War II.

“(Edwards) took it upon himself to travel down to Richmond to meet with the executive committee of the Baptist Board,” Robinson said. “You have to remember this was during World War II, during a time when people knew nothing but cutbacks. This was a time not to spend but to save.”

However, Robinson noted, when The Culpeper was dedicated in October 1950, the new building was paid for as the result of an intensive state-wide capital campaign by Edwards and his team. “That’s an essential part of our past,” Robinson said.

Susan Rucker, chair of LifeSpire’s board of trustees, talks with a guest during The Culpeper’s groundbreaking celebration.

While Robinson shared about the past, residents Mary Miller and Kathy Davis shared their enthusiasm for living at The Culpeper today, describing it a “wonderful experience.”

“I’ve felt safe and secure, Miller said. “And the residents have been like a second family.”

Davis agreed. “We were tired of raking leaves. Facing reality, we knew we’d face life changes, and we would need to move into a retired assisted living community,” Davis said. “We have found exactly what we were looking for.”

Residents and guests enjoy breaking ground on the new building.

Looking toward the future, Jonathan Cook, current president and CEO of Lifespire of Virginia, began by reading a 1980s-era letter from former board chair, Hunter Riggins. The letter detailed the need for a new building at The Culpeper and the lack of resources available at that time to provide one.

“This letter was written in 1980, meaning we’ve been talking about a new building for quite a long time within Virginia Baptist Homes,” Cook said. “Today we are excited to say that we are making that a reality. While we honor our past, it is now time to look toward the future.”

The original Culpeper building stands behind the site of the new community, which will face the Blue Ridge mountains.

“This building has been our ancestral home for almost 70 years,” Cook continued. “This building has provided care for tens of thousands of Virginia Baptists; this building has provided a living for thousands of staff in the area, and this building has been closely tied to the identity of Virginia Baptist Homes.”

“Today we are starting a new beginning for the Culpeper,” Cook concluded. “I just want to thank you all for being a part of it and challenge us all to make sure we carry that long and rich history and tradition of care into our new building.”

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

The Culpeper to break ground on May 10

By Ann Lovell

An architectural rendering of the exterior of the new building at The Culpeper highlights the state-of-the-art facility.

CULPEPER, Virginia—Residents at The Culpeper, a LifeSpire of Virginia continuing care retirement community, will soon say goodbye to their 70-year-old building and welcome a new state-of-the-art facility. The new Culpeper will offer residents larger living space, modern dining facilities, a state-of-the-art fitness center, and a memory care neighborhood, the only one of its kind in the Culpeper area.

On May 10, The Culpeper will break ground on its new community. While the old building will continue to serve residents until the new building is completed, residents and the greater Culpeper community are invited to gather on the front lawn at 2 p.m., May 10, to participate in the groundbreaking ceremony. Utilizing the theme, “Building for Tomorrow,” the afternoon will include brief remarks from community leaders, displays of historic photos, a video of the original 1949 ground breaking, and architectural renderings of the future community, among other surprises.

And yes, there will be opportunity to move some dirt.

“Yes, there will be shovels,” said Jim Jacobsen, executive director of The Culpeper. “We will have opportunity for everyone to put a shovel in the ground. We expect it to be a fun afternoon, and we are pleased to open our doors to the community for this event.”

When the original building was constructed in 1949, it was state-of-the-art for the time. Over the years, however, the building could not keep pace with the demands of today’s active seniors, explained Peter Robinson, Vice-President of Marketing and Public Relations for LifeSpire of Virginia, The Culpeper’s parent company.

“The new facility is modern and state-of-the-art, in keeping with the vision of The Culpeper’s original founders,” Robinson said. “We want to assure that seniors who live in the Culpeper community don’t have to leave Culpeper to find compassionate care in modern, comfortable surroundings.”

While a new building is welcomed, demolishing a 70-year-old building steeped in tradition doesn’t happen without a degree of sentimentality. Jacobsen and his team worked with The Culpeper’s residents and the greater Culpeper community to discuss their feelings associated with tearing down the old building. As a result, some of the features of the old building will be preserved, including the stained glass from the chapel, which will be displayed in the new lobby.

“We recognize the rich legacy of our past, and we honor those beginnings,” Jacobsen said. “At the same time, we are embracing the future and renewing our commitment to tomorrow’s seniors to provide exceptional care in a family atmosphere. That commitment is what makes The Culpeper such a special place to live.”

The Culpeper is located at 12425 Village Loop in Culpeper, Virginia, 22701. Phone number is 540-825-2411.

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.
LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

LifeSpire communities recognized for excellence

10/18/16

By Ann Lovell

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RICHMOND, Virginia—LifeSpire leadership recognized each of its four continuing care retirement communities for operational and customer service excellence at an awards ceremony Sept. 27. LifeSpire owns and operates four retirement communities serving approximately 1,200 residents throughout Virginia: The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville, The Chesapeake in Newport News, and Lakewood in Richmond.

The awards included:

  • Perfect survey: Presented to the communities that achieved a perfect survey or no deficiencies on annual state health inspections for skilled nursing.
    • Perfect survey 2015: The Glebe
    • Perfect survey 2015: Lakewood
    • Perfect survey 2016: The Chesapeake
  • Spirit of Giving 2016 for highest percentage of employees participating in the employee crisis fund: The Culpeper
  • First Impression 2016 for best appearance of the community: The Culpeper
  • Overall resident satisfaction 2015 for highest resident satisfaction on the 2015 Independent Living resident satisfaction survey: The Glebe
  • Overall resident satisfaction participation 2015 for the highest percentage participation in the 2015 resident satisfaction process: The Glebe
  • Overall employee satisfaction participation 2016 for the highest percentage of employee participation in the 2016 employee satisfaction survey: The Glebe
  • Overall employee satisfaction 2016 for the highest cumulative score on the 2016 employee satisfaction survey: Lakewood
  • Safety First Award for the least amount of dollars spent per claim year: The Glebe
  • Fiscal Management 2015 for the community that performed best compared to budget in relation to campus financial results: Lakewood
  • Fiscal Management 2016 for the community that performed best compared to budget in relation to campus financial results: The Culpeper
  • Graves-Morris Award for largest net gain in independent living occupancy: The Culpeper
  • The Appalachian Trail Award for most independent living move-ins: Lakewood
  • Mount Everest Award for highest sustained occupancy: Lakewood
  • Peak Performance Award for highest closing ratio:
    • Rose Wallace of The Culpeper
    • Dreama Slone of the The Glebe
    • Liz Gee of The Chesapeake
  • The Innovator’s Award for marketing innovation: The Chesapeake

Each LifeSpire community provides a full continuum of care to address the changing health needs of seniors. Readily accessible assisted living, 24-hour nursing care, physical therapy and memory support services combined with a focus on exceptional dining, wellness and hospitality are hallmarks of each LifeSpire community. For more information, contact one of our marketing professionals at the community nearest you:

Rose Wallace, The Culpeper in Culpeper, 540-825-2411 or email rwallace@theculpeper.org
Helen Burnett, The Glebe in Daleville, 540-591-2100 or email hburnett@theglebe.org
Liz Gee, The Chesapeake in Newport News, 757-223-1600 or email lgee@thechesapeake.org
Donna Buhrman, Lakewood in Richmond, 804-740-1900 or email dbuhrman@lakewoodwestend.org


Ann Lovell is corporate director of communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

LifeSpire residents participate in Active Aging Week … and stay fit year-round

By Ann Lovell

Since 2003, the International Council on Active Aging has promoted Active Aging Week during the last week of September. LifeSpire residents in each of its four communities participated in a variety of activities, Sept. 25 – Oct. 1, including walking tours, aquatic exercise, glow-in-the-dark games, Segway outings, drum circles, and mystery walks.

nustep-marathonNuStep Marathon: Forty-three residents participated in The Glebe’s NuStep marathon. Each signed up for a 30-minute time slot on a NuStep machine, keeping two NuSteps occupied continuously for about 11 hours! A few residents who had never tried the NuStep joined a team, prompting Rachel Carson, The Glebe’s wellness coordinator, to proclaim the NuStep marathon the “biggest success” of this year’s Active Aging Week.

lakewood-active-aging-allen-brownLakewood’s drum circle: This interactive event allowed Lakewood residents to enjoy making music while reaping the health benefits of ensemble drumming. While research suggests learning any new skill diminishes and even prevents senile dementia, the physical act of drumming has additional advantages, including improved circulation and loosening stiff joints in the shoulders, arms, and hands.

Research shows that an active lifestyle lessens the challenges and increases the opportunities associated with aging. In addition to celebrating Active Aging Week, LifeSpire seeks to provide an environment within its four communities that offers aging adults programs, guidance, and support for healthy aging — all year long.

the-culpeper-mr-bob-hill Bob Hill, a resident at The Culpeper, is one example of a LifeSpire resident committed to wellness. Hill stays fit by running three times a week, and his fitness goals give him the strength, energy and stamina to volunteer with a number of humanitarian organizations. In the past, Hill’s volunteerism led him to North Africa where he helped build dams, repair schools, and mentor the children of female prisoners who lived in the prison with their mothers. He has also served the needs of low-income people through World Changers in Norfolk by inspecting homes and offering needed repairs to make the homes safer, warmer and drier.

jesse-hughesJesse Hughes, a resident of The Chesapeake, is another example of LifeSpire wellness. Hughes participated in the Virginia Senior Games May 17 – 21 with more than 2,100 participants. Hughes won a gold medal in basketball and three silver medals in the 50-yard run, 25-meter backstroke, and the broad jump. Since moving to The Chesapeake, Hughes has made sure to keep his body in top shape by participating in the many wellness programs the community offers.


LifeSpire owns and operates four continuing care retirement communities serving approximately 1,200 residents throughout Virginia: The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville, The Chesapeake in Newport News, and Lakewood in Richmond.

Each LifeSpire community provides a full continuum of care to address the changing health needs of seniors. Readily accessible assisted living, 24-hour nursing care, physical therapy and memory support services combined with a focus on exceptional dining, wellness and hospitality are hallmarks of each LifeSpire community. For more information, contact one of our marketing professionals at the community nearest you:

Rose Wallace, The Culpeper in Culpeper, 540-825-2411
Helen Burnett, The Glebe in Daleville, 540-591-2100
Liz Gee, The Chesapeake in Newport News, 757-223-1600
Donna Buhrman, Lakewood in Richmond, 804-740-2900

Ann Lovell is corporate director of communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. For more information, contact her at alovell@lifespireliving.org or (804) 521-9192.

The Culpeper’s bridge club provides social connections, mental fitness for residents

05/23/16

Editor’s note: In celebration of Older Americans Month, LifeSpire of Virginia is featuring one or two residents a week from its four continuing care retirement communities who most embody the characteristics of a “trailblazer” in wellness, community and hospitality.

By Ann Lovell

CULPEPER, Virginia—Jean Isaacson, 72, was disappointed there wasn’t a bridge club at The Culpeper, the LifeSpire of Virginia continuing care retirement community where she’s lived since 2013. An accountant who had started her own business in 1980, Isaacson learned to play bridge as a teen and taught the game when she lived in Chicago from 1972-1975.

Then she met Lila Bunt, 89, another avid bridge player who has lived at The Culpeper since 2011.

“Lila and I were walking from ‘the big house’ (the building that houses the dining room and community center) to our cottages,” Isaacson recalls. “I told her how I wished we had a bridge club. ‘Let’s start one!’ Lila said. So we did.”

Bunt laughs. “Two heads plus a need equals a bridge club,” she says.

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Jean Isaacson (left) and Lila Bunt (right) discuss how bridge club began at The Culpeper, the LifeSpire of Virginia continuing care retirement community where they live.

The two women started the club with one table in 2013. Then, they asked Pat Ballard, The Culpeper’s Director of Resident Services, to add it to the The Culpeper’s activities’ calendar each month. Soon Bunt and Isaacson were offering weekly classes to those interested in learning the game. Eight players joined a cruise the group took in early 2015, and today the group has grown to 14.

“We need two more players to have four tables,” Isaacson says.

Isaacson and Bunt are two of LifeSpire’s featured trailblazers during Older Americans Month in May. The U.S. Administration for Community Living sets aside May each year to recognize the contributions of older Americans. The 2016 theme is “Blaze a Trail.” Ballard recommended the two women for their initiative in starting the bridge club.

“LifeSpire trailblazers model wellness, community, and hospitality,” agrees Jonathan Cook, LifeSpire President and CEO. “By starting the bridge club, Mrs. Isaacson and Mrs. Bunt showed the kind of community spirit we appreciate from all our residents.”

‘MENTAL GYMNASTICS’

Bridge evolved from the British card game whist and dates back to the 1700s. In 1925 railroad heir Harold Stirling Vanderbilt created the modern version of contract bridge, the version The Culpeper club plays. According to David Owen of The New Yorker, Vanderbilt “had been annoyed by what he felt were deficiencies in the previous version, auction bridge.” Contract bridge caught on quickly, especially as the Great Depression set in, and by the 1940s, 44 percent of American families played the game.

Today, an estimated 25 million Americans enjoy bridge, including such notables as Warren Buffet and Bill Gates, who often play as a team. The majority of bridge players are over age 50, says Jon Saraceno in an article for AARP.

“Bridge’s intricacies make it particularly appealing for those who want to sharpen acuity with mental gymnastics,” Saraceno writes. “A study in 2000 at the University of California Berkeley, found strong evidence that an area in the brain used in playing bridge stimulates the immune system. Researchers suggest that is because players must use memory, visualization and sequencing.”

Additional research by Dr. Claudia Kawas of the University of California Irvine, seems to indicate bridge, with its added social element, may have a slight edge over other mental games in staving off dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

“We think, for example, that it’s very important to use your brain, to keep challenging your mind, but all mental activities may not be equal,” Kawas says. “We’re seeing some evidence that a social component may be crucial.”

A REWARDING PURSUIT

Isaacson and Bunt carve out lots of time each week for bridge. The two women teach bridge on Wednesdays, developing lessons based on the book, “The Fun Way to Advanced Bridge” by Harry Lampert.

“Many of those who come last played in college,” Bunt says. “It’s a great way to welcome new residents to the community.”

The group plays together at The Culpeper on Fridays. Isaacson plays with a group at her home on Saturdays, and Bunt and her husband, John, play Tuesday evenings at the local country club with people from the greater Culpeper community.

When they aren’t playing bridge, the two women are also involved in other activities in their community. Bunt and her husband regularly work in the food pantry at their local church, St. Stephens Episcopal in downtown Culpeper. Isaacson reads to an older friend, plays rummy with older residents, and enjoys caring for her granddaughter one day a week.

Still, bridge has provided a strong bond between the two women and allowed them to forge friendships with other residents as well.

“It’s very rewarding,” Bunt says. “It keeps us busy and provides a lot of good laughs.”


Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community is now The Culpeper

TheCulpeper
Residents of The Culpeper listen as the community’s name change is announced.

By Ann Lovell

CULPEPER, Virginia—Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community has changed its name to The Culpeper, Executive Director Jim Jacobsen announced in a community meeting with residents April 6.

“While we are proud of our Baptist heritage, we believe this name change better reflects where we are today — a community who welcomes and supports people of all backgrounds in the faith-based family atmosphere Culpeper residents have come to expect,” Jacobsen said.

Built in the late 1940s, The Culpeper is the fulfillment of Dr. J. T. Edwards’ vision to assist Virginia Baptists in their retirement years. Since then, LifeSpire of Virginia (formerly Virginia Baptist Homes) has grown to four continuing care retirement communities in Culpeper, Newport News, Richmond and the Roanoke Valley. Each community provides a full continuum of care to address the changing health needs of seniors.

In addition to the name change, plans are underway to expand and revitalize The Culpeper campus, including a new front entrance and building, said Peter Robinson, LifeSpire’s Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations. Access to the community will change from Route 15 to Route 299, and the new campus will face the Blue Ridge Mountains. Additional services will include a rehab-to-home neighborhood, memory care and skilled nursing.

“For Culpeper, this is long overdue,” Robinson said. “We have long been known for providing some of the best care in the area. We have been accomplishing this in a building built in the late 40s. We can’t wait to give residents and staff a new building, multiple dining venues, a wellness center, library, walking trails and all the amenities our residents deserve.”


Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. Contact her at alovell@lifespireliving.org or (804) 521-9192.

CBRC seeks new chaplain, partners with Culpeper Baptist Church

Feb. 19, 2016

CBRC frontCULPEPER, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia and Culpeper Baptist Church (CBC) are embarking on a collaborative venture by creating a shared ministerial position to benefit residents of the Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community (CBRC) and members of the CBC congregation. Culpeper Baptist Church is seeking an individual to serve as chaplain at CBRC and as Senior Adult Minister at CBC.

Both CBRC and CBC are entering creative times of ministry. CBRC is actively planning for construction of new accommodations to serve their residents. CBC recently completed a $2.6 million expansion and seeks new ministries to engage a changing community.

“We welcome opportunities for collaborative partnerships such as this,” said Jonathan Cook, President and CEO of LifeSpire of Virginia, CBRC’s parent organization. “This is just another example of how LifeSpire values our faith-based heritage and works as a true partner with Virginia Baptists.”

The ideal candidate will be seminary-trained and willing to explore new pathways of ministry to people over age 60.

Interested candidates should send a resume to Dan Carlton, dcarlton@culpeperbaptist.org.

Closing date: May 30, 2016

Position Title: Senior Adult Minister/Chaplain
Weekly Expectation: Full-Time
Church/Ministry Name: Culpeper Baptist Church
Church/Ministry Location: Culpeper, Virginia
Church website: http://www.culpeperbaptist.org
CBRC website: http://culpeperretirement.org/
LifeSpire website: http://lifespireliving.org/
#LifeSpireLiving

About Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community and LifeSpire of Virginia:

Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community is a faith-based, not-for-profit Continuing Care Retirement Community operated by LifeSpire of Virginia (formerly Virginia Baptist Homes). CBRC opened 70 years ago and has served as the cornerstone of LifeSpire of Virginia’s benevolent ministry. This warm, inviting community continues to be an extraordinary place for seniors to live in one of the most scenic areas in Virginia.

LifeSpire of Virginia (formerly Virginia Baptist Homes) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing dignity in living to seniors. LifeSpire of Virginia operates four not-for-profit, faith-based Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News; Culpeper Baptist Retirement Community in Culpeper; The Glebe in Daleville; and Lakewood in Richmond.

CULPEPER BAPTIST RETIREMENT COMMUNITY EXPANSION

October 20, 2015 — Culpeper, VA — Culpeper Baptist Retirement community (CBRC), a faith-based continuing care retirement community with a history of more than 65 years has announced that the Board of Trustees has approved expansion plans for the CBRC campus located on Route 15 South in Culpeper.  CBRC was a vision and dream of Dr. J. T. Edwards, a former pastor of Culpeper Baptist Church.  CBRC is operated by Virginia Baptist Homes, Inc., which operates four communities serving more than 1,200 seniors. CBRC enjoys a stellar reputation including with the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services for its licensed nursing home.

Residents of CBRC attended meetings on Monday, October 19, to receive an overview of the plans for new Residential Apartments, which will include licensed Assisted Living, a dedicated neighborhood for seniors with dementia or memory impairment, and a licensed nursing home with a dedicated area for rehabilitation.  Staff announced that the new buildings being planned for the CBRC campus will replace the existing Assisted Living and Nursing Home buildings.  The staff shared with residents that there will be opportunities for input and suggestions from residents and their families regarding the design and programming of the new building.

The project has been a long time coming, and comments from residents during the question and answered periods reflected their appreciation that plans are moving forward with an expansion.

In addition to CBRC, Virginia Baptist Homes, Inc. operates the following not-for-profit faith-based continuing care retirement communities:  The Chesapeake in Newport News, Lakewood in Richmond, and The Glebe in Daleville as well as the Virginia Baptist Homes Foundation.

MEDIA CONTACT:  Peter Robinson

Vice President for Marketing and Public Relations

Virginia Baptist Homes

Corporate Headquarters: 1900 Lauderdale Drive,

Richmond, VA 23238

Telephone: (804) 601-4585