Category Archives: Corporate Office

LifeSpire of Virginia appoints new leadership at The Glebe

By Ann Lovell

Ellen D’Ardenne is the new executive director of The Glebe.

RICHMOND, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia is pleased to announce the selection of Ellen D’Ardenne as executive director of The Glebe, a LifeSpire continuing care retirement community in Daleville.

Most recently, D’Ardenne served as administrator of health services at The Glebe. She joined The Glebe in 2005 as the director of dining services. After 25 years of food service management in the hotel, restaurant, and senior living industries, D’Ardenne was looking for a new challenge. In May 2006, she began a health care administration degree program, which led her to become a licensed nursing home administrator in June 2010. With experience in assisted living administration and skilled nursing management, she further expanded her role in April 2011 by assuming leadership of The Glebe’s health and wellness programs.

“We are pleased to promote Ms. D’Ardenne to lead The Glebe,” said Jonathan Cook, LifeSpire president and CEO. “She has been a part of The Glebe from its beginnings and has played a major role in The Glebe’s success. We have every confidence she will lead The Glebe with excellence and a focus on resident-centered care.”

D’Ardenne and her husband, Dwayne, have three children. She enjoys cooking, kayaking, cycling, and running.

Brandon Evans is the new administrator of health services at The Glebe.

In a related move, The Glebe’s director of nursing, Brandon Evans, has been promoted to administrator of health services, the position vacated by D’Ardenne’s promotion. Evans joined The Glebe in 2011. He is a registered nurse who began his health services career as a nursing assistant, progressed to a licensed practical nurse and then obtained his registered nurse license. Evans’ nursing background includes supervisory responsibilities over a large skilled nursing program with more than 180-skilled beds, infection control, quality improvement and staff development.

Brandon received his associate’s degree in science, registered nursing, cum laude from Virginia Western Community College, and he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society. He received a bachelor of science in nursing from the Jefferson College of Health Science. He and his wife, Amy, have two children. He enjoys hunting and fishing.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

Dr. Franklin T. Fowler, missionary physician, dies at 100

By Ann Lovell

RICHMOND, Virginia—Franklin Thomas Fowler, M.D., died Sept. 10, 2017, at age 100 at Lakewood, a continuing care retirement community in Richmond’s West End. Dr. Fowler grew up in Argentina as the child of missionary parents. After college at Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, Dr. Fowler went on to Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville where, thanks to the start of World War II, he and his class earned their medical degrees a few months earlier than planned. In 1947, Fowler and his wife, Dorcas, were appointed to Paraguay as medical missionaries with the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board (FMB, now International Mission Board). Their task was to build a hospital. In an interview shortly before his 100th birthday in March, Dr. Fowler credited the Baptist Medical Center in Asunción, Paraguay, as one of his greatest accomplishments.

The Fowlers left Paraguay in 1956 to accept an assignment in Mexico, and in 1960, the family moved to Richmond where Dr. Fowler served as the FMB’s first medical consultant. During his tenure in FMB’s home office, Dr. Fowler focused on missionary health and started the Baptist Medical/Dental Fellowship, which remains active today.

The Fowlers moved to Lakewood in 1987, where they quickly became active in the community. They started a worship service for healthcare residents, and Dr. Fowler continued to write and paint, chronicling his life in “From There to Here: The Story of a Missionary Child,” which was published in July. Dorcas, his wife of 70 years, died June 26 at the age of 96.

A memorial service is planned for Saturday, Oct. 14 at 11 a.m. at River Road Church, Richmond, where Dr. and Mrs. Fowler’s ashes will be entombed.  Arrangements by Woody Funeral Home, Parham Chapel. Condolences may be offered at woodyfuneralhomeparham.com

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

Dr. Valerie Carter elected as LifeSpire Trustee

By Ann Lovell

Richmond, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia is pleased to announce the election of Dr. Valerie Carter as the newest member of LifeSpire’s Board of Trustees. Carter was elected at the trustee’s quarterly meeting Sept. 12 at The Glebe, a LifeSpire continuing care retirement community in Daleville, outside Roanoke.

Carter is currently the executive director/treasurer of Woman’s Missionary Union of Virginia (WMUV) and has worked in ministry roles with Virginia Baptists since 1988. In addition to her current position, Carter’s roles included Director of Hillside Baptist Center, WMUV Associate of Christian Social Ministries, and Associate Pastor of “Glocal” (global and local) ministries at Bon Air Baptist Church in Richmond. She is also an adjunct instructor of sociology at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College.

“We are pleased to welcome Dr. Carter to the board of LifeSpire,” said Jonathan Cook, President and CEO. “Her background in ministry and her strong ties to Virginia Baptists will help us realize our vision of vibrant communities where faith, wellness and community flourish.”

Carter holds the doctor of ministry degree from the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, a master’s in sociology from VCU, a master’s of divinity from Virginia Union University School of Theology, and a bachelor’s in sociology from Adelphi University. Carter is a native of Long Island, New York, the widow of Rev. Hylan Carter, Jr., and the mother of two sons.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

LifeSpire seniors to ‘bike for benevolence’ Sept. 28

Bob Hill, 80, a resident of The Culpeper, regularly runs and bikes to keep in shape. Hill will participate in “Biking for Benevolence” Sept. 28, a wellness event hosted by LifeSpire’s Virginia Baptist Homes Foundation.

By Ann Lovell

RICHMOND, Virginia—Never underestimate the strength of a senior. Five LifeSpire of Virginia residents — ranging in age from 70 to 80 — will bike the Virginia Capital trail Sept. 28. The event for LifeSpire residents, staff, trustees and families will highlight Active Aging Week and raise awareness of the mission of Virginia Baptist Homes Foundation, said Patricia Morris, a LifeSpire vice president and head of the VBH Foundation.  The ride offers starting points at mile posts 42, 27 or 20, and the group of 17 riders will finish in Jamestown at mile post 0.

The International Council on Aging designated the last full week in September as Active Aging Week beginning in 2003.  Held this year from Sept. 24-30, Active Aging Week celebrates aging and showcases the capability of older adults. Through the bike event, LifeSpire of Virginia is linking senior wellness with the opportunity to support those who outlive their financial resources, Morris said.

“Last year, VBH Foundation gave more than $1.1 million to 59 life care residents across all four LifeSpire communities. Thanks to the support of our donors, no life care resident has ever been asked to leave a community because they ran out of money,” Morris said. “The support of our foundation provides LifeSpire’s residents the peace of mind that allows them to flourish.”

Riders may start from mile post 42 or 27 at 11 a.m. or at mile post 20 at 12:30 p.m. Riders are expected to finish around 3 p.m. at mile post 0 in Jamestown. The Cap Trail shuttle is providing free shuttle service to event participants.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities across Virginia: The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville, The Chesapeake in Newport News, and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia. Contact her at alovell@lifespireliving.org or (804) 521-9192.

NOW HIRING: Executive Director of The Glebe

08/18/17

RICHMOND, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia is seeking to hire an executive director for The Glebe, a not-for-profit life plan community in Daleville, Virginia. The Glebe is one of four communities owned and operated by LifeSpire of Virginia, based in Richmond, Virginia.

The Glebe currently consists of 154 independent living apartments/cottages, 32 assisted living beds, and 32 skilled nursing beds.  Master Planning is underway to consider growth opportunities for additional independent living apartments and/or a memory care neighborhood.

The community has an outstanding reputation in the Roanoke market and currently provides service to 256 residents and currently employs 192 staff members. The health center provides excellent care and has a 5-star rating with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Reporting to the Chief Operating Officer, the Executive Director is responsible for continuing and enhancing the reputation of the community by providing strategic leadership consistent with the LifeSpire mission, vision, and values. The Executive Director shall provide leadership in the development of policies, procedures and plans which result in the accomplishment of both the organization’s long- and short-range goals. The Executive Director is responsible for ensuring the development and delivery of appropriate services to residents, clients, and their families.

Key qualifications, duties, and personal characteristics for this position are:

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Minimum 5 years’ experience as an Executive Director of a life plan community
  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field
  • NHA license is a plus, but not required
  • Thorough understanding of the senior housing industry
  • Financial management skills; ability to develop and manage the budget for the entire community; identify areas for expense savings or revenue generating opportunities
  • Ability to maintain and strengthen positive working relationships with staff, residents, and leadership across communities
  • With support of the leadership team, develop and implement a strategic plan that aligns with the LifeSpire mission, vision, and values
  • Provide quality programming and services that meet the needs of today’s and tomorrow’s consumer
  • Develop and sustain a community culture of teamwork, professionalism, mutual respect, continuous quality improvement, and accountability
  • Develop a strong team of competent and committed professionals who are committed to service excellence
  • Articulate a vision, create consensus, and motivate people to build a sense of community

KEY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Support the strategic plan and direction of LifeSpire of Virginia.
  • Direct the overall operations of the facility while complying with state and federal regulations as well as the company’s policies and procedures
  • Ensure compliance and licensure with all licensing agencies
  • Manage occupancy development.
  • Plan, develop, and manage facility’s operating and capital budgets
  • Develop and monitor all contracted provider services.
  • Foster effective communications and teamwork among the facility’s management group
  • Maintain current knowledge about changes in federal, state, and local regulations
  • Focus on achieving and maintaining 5-star status in the community

PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS:

The ideal candidate will be a competent, compassionate, and committed professional who is willing to enter into a long-term commitment of service to the organization and do so within a team-oriented, collaborative, servant-leadership environment.  He/she will be a person of high integrity and ethical standards and have a personal reputation that will reflect well on the organization.  Of equal importance will be a high standard of care and concern for current and future residents.  He/she will evidence a commitment to establishing community collaborations. As a relationship-oriented person, the Executive Director will be an excellent communicator and will maintain a visible presence among staff, residents, clients, and within the surrounding community.

This job offers a competitive base salary with a bonus incentive structure, as well as an excellent benefits package. The full-time benefits package includes options for health, dental, and life insurance, retirement plan, generous paid time off, and relocation assistance.  EOE.

Qualified applicants may apply by e-mailing a resume to:

jobs@lifespireliving.org

 

 

Top Ten Questions Prospective CCRC Residents Should Ask

08/21/17

If you or a loved one is considering a continuing care retirement community, here are ten of the most important questions you should ask:

10. What is the ratio of independent living residences to assisted living and healthcare residences?

Some CCRCs are mainly independent living communities with a proportionately small number of assisted living or skilled care units available. This is particularly concerning for newer communities, where very few residents require care now but may in the future. The question is whether there will be enough availability in the healthcare center for residents requiring care at that time. On the flip side, some CCRCs evolved out of established nursing care facilities that added a few independent living residences. In this case, you may find proportionately more residents requiring care services than living independently. On average independent living residences represent 60-75 percent of the total residential units.

9. How have your monthly rates changed over the last five years?

This is important to ask for two reasons. First, it gives you an indication of what to expect going forward so you can plan accordingly. Second, it could also be an indication of the community’s financial viability. Average fee increases of 3-4 percent per year are not uncommon in the industry. If you find there have been years when the increase has been substantially more, you should find out why. Be sure you ask what the increases have been each year over the past 3-5 years, as opposed to an average. Averages can sometimes hide larger increases in a given year.

8. What services are included in my monthly fee, and what will cost extra?

When a provider shares with you their monthly rates, be sure to find out what types of services are included, and which are extra. In some cases, you could ultimately spend considerably more than the published rate each month. This is particularly important if you are comparing two communities and one operates à la carte, while the other operates under an all-inclusive model. One example of this would be the number of meals per day included in the monthly rate.

7. What is the level of experience of your management team and board of directors?

An experienced management team is vitally important to maintaining high operating standards and diligent financial management. Ask whether the management team has a track record of managing other CCRCs. Also look for a board of directors that is culturally and professionally diverse. The board should have directors with strong backgrounds in healthcare, hospitality, finance, and real estate. You can learn more about LifeSpire’s management team here.

6. What happens if I run out of money and can’t pay fees?

Most CCRCs, particularly not-for-profit providers and even some for-profits, will do everything possible to help residents stay put and receive services if the resident runs out of money due to no fault of their own. In fact, many providers maintain a financial assistance or endowment fund to help with this effort. Yet, there are some CCRCs that will ask you to vacate your residence if you are no longer able to pay. LifeSpire’s VBH Foundation raises funds to help LifeSpire’s life care residents who outlive their financial resources remain in their homes. In 2016, the VBH Foundation provided more than $1.1 million in benevolence to 59 residents across all four LifeSpire communities.

5. How will my monthly rate be impacted if I require assisted living or skilled nursing care?

There are several different types of residency contracts offered by CCRCs. The key with each one is to understand what happens to your monthly fees if you ultimately require assisted living services or skilled nursing care. All other things being equal, there is generally a trade-off between the amount of the entry fee and monthly fees, and the amount you will ultimately pay if you require care services.

4. Does your published rate for healthcare services include a semi-private or private room?

The published rates for a room in the healthcare center may reflect only semi-private rooms. You may be required to pay the difference in cost for a private room. Some providers only offer private rooms.

3. What are the stipulations for receiving a refund (if the community offers refundable entry fees)?

If you are considering a CCRC that offers partially or fully refundable entry fees, ask if your home or apartment within the community has to be resold before the refund will be paid. Is there a maximum time limit whereby the refund will be paid regardless of whether the residential unit has been resold or not? Also, are you or your heirs required to continue paying the monthly fees during that time period?

2. What information can you provide to help assure me that the level of care provided in your healthcare center is of the highest quality?

Although it could be years before you require assisted living or healthcare services, you want to know that when that day comes, you will receive the best care possible. Ask to take a tour of the healthcare center, and closely observe the facilities and the care team. Does the staff seem happy and attentive to residents? Is the facility clean and without odor? Ask about staff turnover ratios. The industry average for skilled nursing centers is around 40 percent. A low turnover rate generally indicates a happy staff, which translates into better care for residents. If the healthcare center is Medicare certified you can also visit Medicare.gov to find information on complaints, deficiencies, staffing, and more. All of LifeSpire’s communities have received either a 4- or 5-star CMS rating.

1. What information can you provide to help assure me that your community is financially positioned to meet its long-term commitment to residents?

In order to fulfill its long-term obligation to residents, a CCRC must maintain a strong financial standing. A financial professional who is well-versed in the financial operations of CCRCs can help you analyze key financial ratios, such as operating margins and debt service coverage, but a few things to look for initially are a willingness by representatives of the community to share their audited financial statements, positive net worth, strong demand (usually indicated by occupancy ratios above 90 percent), well-kept facilities, and an experienced management team. Also consider whether the community is located in a state that regulates CCRCs. If so, the state may have minimum financial requirements that must be met on a year-to-year basis. Read more about LifeSpire’s current financial standing.

Retirement counselors at each of our communities are available to answer all these questions and any others you may have. Contact them today!

The Chesapeake (Newport News): 757-223-1600
The Culpeper (Culpeper): 540-825-2411
The Glebe (Daleville): 540-591-2100
Lakewood (Richmond): 804-740-2900

 

 

Content provided by MyLifeSite.com

Helpful Tips for Downsizing in Retirement

One of the main reasons older adults put off downsizing or moving to a retirement community is the need to deal with all the “stuff” they’ve accumulated over the years. Yet, if done right, the process of downsizing may not be as daunting as you think. It may even be enjoyable — even refreshing. A lot of the physical work can be done by others, so your main role is to categorizeorganize, and direct. Here are six tips to get you started:

Start now

If you are thinking about moving, whether to a retirement community or to a smaller home, now is a good time to start the downsizing process. Don’t wait until you are ready to move. At that point, the process and emotions may be overwhelming, and you will have other things that require your attention. Even if you ultimately choose not to move, your family members will thank you! There will be less stuff for them to deal with one day.

Recognize you can’t keep it all

To know what items you can and should purge, you first need to know which items you absolutely cannot part with. But here’s the key: After you have created the initial list, pare it down even further. This can be a tough exercise, but the reality is that some of the things you think you need to save may not be necessary to keep after all. For example, that sport coat in the closet you’ve held onto for 15 years because you are sure you will wear it again? It’s probably time to part ways. That stack of magazines with holiday recipes dating back 10 years? Those can go, too. Your most cherished recipes will not be hidden in a tall stack of magazines anyway, right?

Prepare yourself: Your kids may not want your stuff

Another popular reason for hanging on to various items is that kids or grandkids will want them. But many people eventually discover that the things they thought would be coveted by their adult children were not so desirable after all. To help sort this out, consider inviting your children over for a day to go through your things and find out what they actually want.

Sort by large and small

Once you know what you want to keep, make a list of big and small items. The big items are anything that will not fit in a regular size moving box, such as a sofa or table. As you consider these items, be sure to think about the dimensions and style of your new home so you will know if they will fit. Many CCRCs have move-in coordinators who can help you with this.

Obviously, it could be tough to list out every single smaller item, but you want to think about your most utilized items first. Consider things like silverware, pictures, kitchenware, books, etc.

Sell, donate, or discard?

Once you’ve decided what items are no longer needed, it is time to decide what to do with them. Create a separate list with three columns: Sell, Donate, and Trash. As you consider what you want to sell, remember that items rarely bring in the amount of cash the owner thinks they will. In some cases it may simply be easier to donate or discard an item than to go to the trouble of trying to sell it.

However, if you feel sure it would be worth the time to try to sell some of your belongings, then you have a number of options. You could try to sell them online with sites like Ebay or Craig’s List. (Please take caution if you use Craigslist or a similar website. If possible, meet the buyer in a public place and take someone with you.) Sometimes a good old-fashioned yard sale could do the job, but you will want to get someone to help you with the set up and break down. Alternately, if you have more than a few valuable items, any number of local companies will be willing to administer an estate sale for you.

Hauling the junk

Finally, after you have gone through the above-mentioned steps, you may be surprised by the amount of left over junk. This would include things that have piled up in a garage or crawlspace over the years, such as old paint cans. Many national companies will come by and haul these things away for you. All you have to do is point to the items you want removed, and they will recycle or trash the items accordingly.

If you are considering moving to a LifeSpire community, our move-in coordinators are happy to help you think through what you might or might not need in your new home. Give our marketing departments a call and set up an appointment today!

The Chesapeake (Newport News): 757-223-1600
The Culpeper (Culpeper): 540-825-2411
The Glebe (Daleville): 540-591-2100
Lakewood (Richmond): 804-740-2900

 

 

Content provided by MyLifeSite.com

Fowlers demonstrate a century of faithfulness

07/10/17

By Ann Lovell

Dr. Franklin and Mrs. Dorcas Fowler pose with an early proof of his autobiography in April 2017. Dr. Fowler celebrated his 100th birthday March 28, 2017. Mrs. Fowler passed away June 26, 2017.

RICHMOND, Virginia—Franklin and Dorcas Fowler had been married 70 years when Dorcas died peacefully June 26, 2017, in her home at Lakewood, a LifeSpire of Virginia community in Richmond’s West End. She was 96. Just before Franklin’s 100th birthday in March, the couple was asked how long they’d been married. They exchanged a puzzled glance and then laughed.

“We don’t remember!” Dorcas said. “Forever.”

In that same conversation, Franklin reached for his Bible, opened the front cover, and pulled out a photo of Dorcas as a young woman. He didn’t say much, but his message was clear. His God and his wife are his two most important relationships.

The Fowlers epitomize lives of faithfulness. From childhood, both sought to share God’s love through medicine. Franklin grew up as the child of missionary parents in Argentina, and committed his life to Christ at age 10. After college at Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, he went on to Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, where, thanks to the start of World War II, he and his class earned their medical degrees a few months earlier than planned. Franklin served in combat in France, Luxembourg, and Germany as a doctor with the 110th Evacuation Hospital, semi-mobile. He returned from the war and married Dorcas, a registered nurse, on Aug. 25, 1946.

Dorcas was born in Oklahoma City and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri; a nursing degree from St. Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri; and a Master of Arts degree from The Presbyterian School of Christian Education in Richmond, Virginia.

In 1947, the couple was appointed to Paraguay as medical missionaries with the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board (now International Mission Board). Their task was to build a hospital. Two years later, after surveying the needs, deciding on a location, and purchasing property, Dr. Fowler sent a cable to the FMB: “HOW DO YOU BUILD A HOSPITAL?” He soon received a simple reply from Dr. Everett Gill, FMB’s area secretary for the Americas: “WE ARE PRAYING FOR YOU.”

Looking back on his 100 years, Dr. Fowler credits the hospital in Paraguay as one of his greatest accomplishments. He has reason to be proud. Today, the Baptist Medical Center in Asunción treats about 16,000 patients a month. Under Paraguayan leadership, the hospital has a reputation for excellent medical care and fair business dealings. In 1995, the Baptist Medical Center expanded to include a heart institute, and the next year, doctors there performed Paraguay’s first successful heart transplant.

The Fowlers left Paraguay in 1956 to accept an assignment in Mexico, and in 1960, the family moved to Richmond where Dr. Fowler served as the FMB’s first medical consultant on the home office staff and Dorcas worked as director of the nursing school at Johnston-Willis Hospital until it closed. During his tenure in FMB’s home office, Dr. Fowler focused on missionary health and started the Baptist Medical/Dental Fellowship, which remains active today.

The Fowlers moved to Lakewood in 1987, where they quickly became active in the community. They started a worship service for healthcare residents, and Dr. Fowler continued to write and paint, chronicling his life in “From There to Here: The Story of a Missionary Child.” The missionary life is mobile, and ironically, the Fowlers have lived in retirement at Lakewood for 30 years — longer than anywhere else in their storied and very active lives.

“I can’t imagine Lakewood without the Fowlers,” said Eileen Kwak, the community’s director of resident services. “They are an icon here.”

The Fowlers represent a generation of people who understand the meaning of words like faithfulness, loyalty, commitment, and community — values on which LifeSpire communities are built and continue to thrive. Even at the end of her life, Dorcas faithfully cared for Franklin, Kwak said. As Dorcas’ life ebbed away, Franklin sat quietly, holding her hand.

Franklin and Dorcas also believed they could make a difference in the world for the cause of Christ, and they were willing to endure any hardship to do so. Franklin’s autobiography tells of their first trip to Paraguay by boat when Dorcas was eight months pregnant with their oldest child.

“This proved to be a bad time for Dorcas to travel,” Franklin wrote in “From There to Here.” “Eight months pregnant, the rolling of the ship kept her in her bunk most of the way. I’m afraid this was not a pleasant Caribbean and South American cruise for her.”

A few weeks later, she delivered their oldest son in a clinic in Asunción, Paraguay — without anesthesia.

“I asked Dr. Aguire later why he did not use anesthesia,” Franklin wrote. “He said that if he lost a Paraguayan patient, it would be considered the will of God, but if he lost an American patient or the baby, his reputation would be ruined, thus he took no risks. Dorcas wished he had taken a little more risk!”

In spite of the difficulties, the Fowlers laid the foundation for international missions — medical and otherwise — for generations to follow. Southern Baptist missions efforts today rest on the shoulders of men and women like Franklin and Dorcas Fowler. More importantly, in a world shaken by brokenness, turmoil, and violence, their lives are steadfast examples of genuine love and faithfulness.

In honor of Dr. Fowler’s 100th birthday and the couple’s strong legacy of faith, LifeSpire of Virginia is pleased to publish his autobiography, “From There to Here: The Story of a Missionary Child,” including the history of Southern Baptist medical missions, which he wrote in 1975, and a collection of poems and paintings, which he created during his years at Lakewood.

Proceeds from the sale of the book benefit LifeSpire’s VBH Foundation, which raises funds to help LifeSpire’s life care residents who outlive their financial resources remain in their homes. The book is available for $14.99 on Amazon and from the VBH Foundation. Contact Ann Lovell for more information. 

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

Mick Feauto, LifeSpire COO, announces retirement

06/30/17

By Ann Lovell

Mick L. Feauto
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

RICHMOND, Virginia—Mick Feauto, LifeSpire of Virginia’s Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (COO), announced his retirement June 27, effective Dec. 31, 2017. Feauto has served as LifeSpire’s executive vice president and COO since 2015. He has 34 years of senior industry experience as a nursing home administrator, executive director, regional vice president of operations, and senior regional vice president of operations. In the 10 years before coming to LifeSpire, Feauto served in regional roles with Life Care Services with oversight of 28 continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs).

During his tenure at LifeSpire, “Mick led our communities through a number of substantive changes with remarkable results,” said Jonathan Cook, LifeSpire president and chief executive officer. “We would not be where we are today without his leadership and vision.”

Cook said the search for Feauto’s successor is underway, and applications will be accepted through July 31, 2017, with interviews expected in August.

“We anticipate having the person selected and on board prior to Mick’s departure to assist with transition,” Cook said. More information and a job description are available on LifeSpire’s website.

In retirement, Feauto and his wife, Laura, plan to split time between their homes in Iowa and Florida.

“Please thank Mick for his service and join me in congratulating him on a fantastic career,” Cook said.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

 

Now Hiring: Chief Operating Officer

LifeSpire of Virginia (formerly Virginia Baptist Homes), a non-profit organization with four continuing care retirement communities within Virginia and a strong benevolent foundation, is currently seeking a Chief Operating Officer (COO).

The COO will be responsible for directing the overall operations in all communities through leadership, management, and vision. This position ensures the company has proper operational controls, administrative support, and reporting procedures in place to ensure financial strength, ratio performance and operating efficiency. The COO will foster a culture of accountability, hospitality, integrity, compliance, quality, and transparency.

This position is based in the home office in Richmond, Virginia, and travel to the communities and continuing education will account for 30-40 percent of time spent traveling outside the home office.

Key Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Support the strategic plan and direction of LifeSpire of Virginia.
  • Direct the overall operations of all communities while complying with state and federal regulations as well as the company’s policies and procedures
  • Oversee the Executive Director of each community to ensure compliance with regulations and to support financial stability of each location
  • Oversee the Corporate Directors of Human Resources, Clinical Operations, and Information Technology to ensure success in those areas across all communities
  • Work directly with the President & CEO, Chief Financial Officer, and the VP of Marketing & Public Relations to provide strong leadership and direction to all communities and the home office
  • Assist with development and management of each community’s operating and capital budgets

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or a related field
  • Licensed, or eligible to be licensed, as a Nursing Home Administrator by the State of Virginia
  • 10+ years Healthcare operational experience
  • 5+ years of progressively responsible management experience (preferably in a service based not-for-profit organization, and within a CCRC)
  • Thorough understanding of the senior housing industry
  • Financial management skills; ability to develop and manage operating and capital budgets; identify areas for expense savings or revenue generating opportunities
  • Ability to maintain and strengthen positive working relationships with staff, residents, and leadership across communities
  • Develop and sustain a company culture of teamwork, professionalism, mutual respect, continuous quality improvement, and accountability
  • Articulate a vision and develop a strong team of competent and committed professionals who are committed to service excellence

This job offers a competitive base salary with a bonus incentive structure, as well as an excellent benefits package. The full-time benefits package includes options for health, dental, and life insurance, retirement plan, generous paid time off, and relocation assistance. EOE.

Qualified applicants should email resume to:  jobs@lifespireliving.org

Resumes will be accepted through 7/31/2017.

LifeSpire of Virginia is not using an executive search firm for this recruitment.